Cast Iron Skillet Fish Nachos

Two for one; as in cook once eat twice.  Have you tried this  short cut for getting healthy and delicious meals on the table? For me, it works as a way to reduce food waste as well,  and it just so happens to be this month’s Recipe Redux theme! Today, I’m taking a recipe already on  my blog, Cedar-Plank Wahoo, and reworking it  into this second meal…

cast iron skillet fish nachos

When making the wahoo, cook a second pound for the nachos or use leftover cooked fish you already have in the refrigerator.  I ‘m using up the remaining cod  from last nights dinner. You can use any white fish; even if you have less than a pound of fish, you can make up the difference by adding some cooked shrimp. This recipe uses my favorite cheese, Cabot Cheddar (I am a proud member of the Cabot Cheese Board.) You can also use a Cabot Pepper Jack. I am keeping it light with low fat yogurt instead of sour cream and knocking off some  homemade baked tortilla  chips.

My recipe  choice  is related to my daunting task  mission of getting my family to eat more fish. I’ve discussed making family favorites vs. pushing the envelope before (Brownie Points or Epic Failure; No Bake Chocolate Mousse), and the inherent risk of failure. So let me be honest, fish isn’t a family favorite.  The Man is  indifferent to it (he eats it, but would prefer something else); my kids don’t like it, period. Usually I make it for myself. Truth.  Last summer was the first time I prepared cedar-plank wahoo, after my son and his friends’ fishing trip promise was fulfilled.  It was the Man who originally came up with the idea of fish nachos for a second meal! After seven months, I’m giving it a try.. so let’s see how this turned out…

Cast Iron Skillet Fish NachosMy daughter breezed through the kitchen as I snapped this shot and said,

Mmm.. that looks so good!

I’m counting that as PLUS ONE. As the man and I sat down to a plate full for lunch, he gave a nod of approval, PLUS TWO. My son gets no voice as he was out of town. Moi?  I thought I hit a dang homerun, PLUS THREE. Hope you will try my healthier version of fish nachos and visit the links at the bottom of the post for more ways to save time and reduce waste with the two for one approach to meal planning.

What strategies do you use to save time and reduce waste in the kitchen?

 

Cast Iron Skillet Fish NachosCast Iron Skillet Fish Nachos

4 entree serving or 8 appetizer servings

by Diane Boyd

Ingredients

  • 1 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 sliced greens onion, divided
  • 1 pound cooked fish, shredded
  • 1/2 cup low fat yogurt or low fat sour cream
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 8 1/2 ounce bag of corn tortilla chips or homemade chips
  • 1 cup salsa
  • 1 cup shredded Cabot cheddar cheese
  • 4 radishes, sliced
  • 2 Tablespoons Cotija cheese

Instructions

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

2. Add olive oil and half of chopped onion to a 10 -inch cast iron skillet.

3. Place skillet in oven and heat until very hot (two to three minutes). Swirl the skillet around to evenly coat the bottom.

4. Meanwhile, mix fish with yogurt, chilli powder, cumin and salt.

5. Remove hot skillet from oven and add tortilla chips to the bottom.

6. Cover chips with fish mixture and top with salsa and cheddar cheese.

7. Bake  for about 10 to 15 minutes or until heated through and cheese is melted. Top with remaining green onions, radishes, and Cotija cheese. Serve hot.

Powered by Recipage


Petition to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics – #RepealTheSeal

Petition to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics -  #RepealTheSealI am participating  in the #RepealTheSeal campaign to show my disagreement with the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ recent decision to allow the Kids Eat Right logo onto food packaging. In invite my fellow colleagues and bloggers, who also share this opinion, or who support this campaign, to also post this Open Letter on their own blog, to sign the petition at change.org, and/or  to use #RepealThe Seal hashtag via social media. ~Diane Boyd, MBA, RD, LDN

This week, there’s been something keeping me awake at night. It’s of great concern to me as a registered dietitian and long term member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND). Today I am voicing my opinion about the partnership between The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Kids Eat Right (KER) Foundation and Kraft, which allows for the inclusion of the KER logo  on packages of Kraft singles (the Academy’s formal press release can be read here.) AND states that this collaboration is an NOT endorsement or a nutrition seal of approval.

However, many members of AND, including myself, are discouraged and saddened by AND’s lack of transparency in this matter. Here’s our complaint:

As dietitians and nutritionists we work hard to provide full transparency in all of our own business relationships, and we expect the same from AND . In the business world, a logo on a product label conveys a seal of endorsement, an alignment, and recognition of a paid relationship.

 Respected dietitian colleages Regan Jones RDRachel Begun, MS, RD; , RD and Kate Geagan, MS, RDN have spearheaded this campaign with an open letter to AND and the public (below) and a petition that anyone can sign. If you share our opinion, here are the steps you can take to help make a difference:

You don’t have to be a dietitian to help #RepealTheSeal:

1. Sign the petition at change.org which outlines the steps we are asking that the Academy and KER take to rectify the situation.

2.Post this open letter on your blog and/or other social media platforms and use the #RepealTheSeal hashtag

3. Invite others to repost on their blogs and/or share the petition link social media networks

________________________________________________________________

OPEN LETTER

March 16, 2015

To Mary Beth Whalen, President Sonja Connor, leadership at the Academy and the Kids Eat Right (KER) Foundation: 

As long-time members and proud supporters of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), we are dismayed, shocked, and saddened by the blog post in last week’s New York Times.  The piece (https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/03/12/a-cheese-product-wins-kids-nutrition-seal/?_r=0 – ) reports on the KER Foundation’s Nutrition seal— a seal that the Academy states was not an endorsement of the product, but is an indicator of the brands that support Kids Eat Right.

As dedicated Registered Dietitians/Nutritionists and food and nutrition experts, we are protesting the Academy’s position to allow the Kids Eat Right logo on Kraft Singles, as well as the possibility to allow any future implied endorsement of any product by AND for the following reasons:

Flawed Understanding of the Marketplace

We wholly reject the rationale that the Academy used in their formal press release to defend the nature of the relationship between Kraft and the Academy. A logo on a product label is an endorsement, an alignment, and recognition of a paid relationship. Simply stating otherwise in a press release, no matter how emphatically, doesn’t change this fact. Rather, AND’s actions illustrate how profoundly out of touch AND is with business principles, which has put our professional integrity and credibility at risk. It is also a decision that is out of touch with members’ values.

Failure to Provide Transparency to AND Members and Consumers  

We work hard to provide full transparency in all of our own business relationships, and we expect the same from the Academy. Failure to be transparent about ANDs actions violates the Academy’s own Ethics Policy*, which calls for the highest standards of honesty and integrity, and for members to not engage in false or misleading practices of communications.

Actions Requested of the Academy: #RepealtheSeal

We ask that the Academy make available to its members, the media and the public the following:

  • We ask for full transparency regarding the process of approval to allow the KER logo on the Kraft product— including the names of those involved, the meeting minutes of the discussion, and Board’s vote on this issue.
  • We ask for full disclosure of the terms of the financial agreement between KER Foundation and Kraft. We also request full transparency regarding the status of future agreements under consideration for use of our Logo.
  • We ask the Academy to provide their plan for the discontinuation of this specific relationship with Kraft and removal of the KER logo off Kraft Singles product packaging.

Academy members deserve strong leaders who will protect the integrity of the Registered Dietitian/Nutritionist credential. This latest action is an embarrassing misstep that must be corrected swiftly in order to prevent further damage to the RD/RDN brand and to the Academy.

Sincerely,

Rachel Begun MS, RDN
Kate Geagan MS, RDN
Regan Jones, RDN
Registered Dietitian/Nutritionists colleagues listed at change.org

*American Dietetic Association/Commission on Dietetic Registration Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics and Process for the Consideration of Ethics Issues. J Acad Nutr Diet 2009;109(8):1461-1467.

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial